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Se Fire – In Every

Here’s my mate’s new video
i lit some of the candles!


and here is the also-very-sick remix by Kahn
double badness

Skating in East Africa-ca-ca-ca

From the New York Times:

Before Jack Mubiru, a father of the skateboarding scene in Uganda, could build a half-pipe in his native Kampala in 2006, he had to avoid paying a construction fee, so he fabricated a story about building a private enclosure for a pet crocodile. Most local officials — and neighborhood residents — had never heard of skateboarding. Six years later, the sport has spread from the skate park to the streets, attracting children as young as 5 and adult women. Its profile is growing throughout eastern Africa, with skate parks built or planned in neighboring Kenya and Tanzania. Proponents of skateboarding say it gives participants a welcome leisure activity in countries where there are few other options. ‘‘There is not much else for younger people to do,’’ Mubiru says. ‘‘So many people want to skateboard.’’

Julie Bosman

Love it! When they open the skate park in Kenya you ALL have to come visit and teach me how to do a kick-flip.

 

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new beat

another late night….

dedicated to my long-time lovely lady

submitted for this month’s beat battle at Digital Vertigo, although theres some seriously dope beats to compete with this month

Extreme crate-digging

This is really something. Patrick Feaster from the Media Preservation Initiative at the University of Indiana, has recreated the sound of one of the earliest known vinyl records, from a picture of the record. Here’s how it works:

“First, I take a high-resolution scan of the print and convert it from a spiral into a set of parallel lines through a polar-to-rectangular-coordinates transform. Next, I “cut” the individual lines and “paste” them end-to-end to create several long, narrow strips. After repairing any breaks in the line, I use a “paintbucket” tool to create two separate bands of varying width—one with the area below the line filled in white, the other with the area above the line filled in white.  Next, I run these images through ImageToSound, a program that converts them into WAV files as though they were variable-area optical film sound tracks.  Finally, I combine the paired WAV into stereo files, stitch the successive pieces together, sum to mono, and voilà—we have sound!”